A Look at K-12 vs. K-8 vs. K-6: Options For L.A. Private Schools by Sanjay Nambiar

School Decisions

 

Dear Readers:

I’m so excited to publish this excellent piece by Sanjay Nambiar. Along with his wife, Priya, Sanjay runs Nambiar Advising and they are parents at PS1 Pluralistic School in Santa Monica. The decision to apply to K-12, K-8 or K-6 can be confusing and a lot of parents end up applying to more than one of these educational models. That’s what my own family did. But what happens when you have to choose between a K-6 and a K-12 for example? What about leaving a K-8 or K-12 before graduation? Read on! Sanjay breaks it all down for you. –Christina

 

Tough Decisions! Should I Lock in the Next 13 Years Now, or Should I Allow for Change?

A Look at K-12 vs. K-8 vs. K-6 Private Schools

You’re ready to apply to private school. You’ve done your research regarding traditional versus progressive pedagogies. You have a good idea of the type of setting where your child will thrive.

Now, should you apply to K-12 schools and be done with the process forever? Or maybe K-6 is a better strategy? And what about K-8? A few schools offer Developmental Kindergarten.

As if worrying about tuition and application essays were not enough, we also have this K-12 vs. K-8 vs. K-6 debate. It’s enough to make any parent pull his or her hair out!

Okay, deep breaths. We can do this. We will do this.

When it comes the grade structure of a school, each option offers a bevy of pros and cons. Ultimately, it’s about finding the right fit for your child and family. What works for Johnny might be the opposite of what’s best for Jennifer. There is no right or wrong strategy.

But there is solace in this. As long as we try our best – and do our research – we’re doing right by our kids. And that is always priority number one (at least in our opinion).

So, let’s jump in . . . Below is a check list of the some of the pros and cons for each of these school structures. This list focuses just on the nature of the grading groups. It doesn’t delve into the specific academic approaches of any school, which often are the biggest determinants of what constitutes a best-fit for a child. Nonetheless, these are a few elements to consider as you’re exploring various schools.

 

K-12 Pros

You don’t have to do this again.

Applying to private school can be a grueling and anxiety-inducing process. From understanding the various school philosophies to the essays, interviews, school tours, and financial aid applications, it’s often overwhelming for even the most prepared families. With a K-12 school, once you’re in, you never need to do this again.

No ISEE

Starting at 5thgrade, students need to take the Independent School Entrance Examination (ISEE) when applying to private school. (Think of it as the SAT for private schools.) But if you’re in a K-12 school, your child doesn’t need to take this test. Ever. That’s a decent amount of stress and studying to avoid.

13 years of consistent families & friends

Many K-12 schools have a special sense of community. Your child can be with the same cohort for up to 13 years. It becomes like family, and those bonds can last a lifetime; some schools even call these kids “lifers”. If the fit is right, this consistency through adolescence and the teenage years can be wonderful. But there’s also another side to this . . . (see below).

 

K-12 Cons

Kids change

Developmentally, we often don’t know the details of a child’s learning style until about 3rdor 4thgrade. Moreover, many kids change significantly during their tween years (10- to 12-years-old). As a result, the academic approach of the school you chose when your child was in Kindergarten might not be a fit when she is in 6thor 7thgrade.

13 years of consistent families & friends

If you don’t love your community in elementary school at K-12 school, you might be out of luck. Your child could be in a peer group that he or she doesn’t connect with, and likewise you might not connect with other parents. And this varies from year to year. The classes above and below your daughter’s might be delightful, but she unfortunately might be stuck with a crew that doesn’t totally fit her – even if new students join the school in 6th, 7th, or 9thgrade. It’s random and sometimes can’t be anticipated. Moreover, as your child changes in the tween and teen years, he might want (or need) a new and different group of friends. Changing at 6thor 9thgrade could be a refreshing move that leads to more success. Further, this change can help prepare kids for the big transition on the not-too-distant horizon: going to college.

 

K-6 Pros

A focus on elementary education

K-6 schools tend to be experts on elementary education. They know the pedagogy and philosophy incredibly well. They know this age group incredibly well. It’s what they do, and all of their resources are devoted to this one aspect of education. There’s no diversion of resources into middle or high school.

An opportunity to change

At 6thgrade, you’ll have a much better idea of how your child learns and in what type of setting he or she will flourish. That means you can apply to great options at 7thgrade, both private and public, that could help foster your child’s academic, creative, and social potential. And that school might be very different from your current K-6 school, and that’s okay. Also, a child can have a special opportunity to change his or her environment in 7thgrade. It’s a time to learn key life skills: how to move to a new setting, how to adapt to new people, and how to cope with change, all with the benefit parental support.

 

K-6 Cons

You’ll have to do this again

As mentioned before, applying to private school can be stressful on many levels. Also, your child will need to take the ISEE (or perhaps another entrance exam, depending on the school) as part of the application. If you’re at a K-12 school, you get to avoid this process.

Change can be hard

Although learning how to adapt to new environments is an important life skill, for some children this type of change can be overwhelming. Combined with the typical trials and tribulations of puberty and early teenage years, switching to a new middle school can be a stressful experience, even if it results in personal growth.

 

K-8 Pros

Easier transition to middle school

K-8 schools enjoy the K-6 pros mentioned above. Additionally, they provide the benefit of a relatively seamless transition to middle school (7th& 8thgrades). This can reduce the stress of changing schools and make those awkward early teenage years a little easier for students, especially those who may be a little shy or vulnerable. Also, 7thand 8thgraders in these schools have an opportunity to be leaders, while delaying the move to another school simultaneously keeps them young. In fact, researchers in one study compared K-8 schools to traditional 6-8 settings and discovered that K-8 students earned higher SAT scores as well as higher GPAs in 9thgrade[1].

 

K-8 Cons

Family attrition

K-8 schools also encounter the same K-6 cons mentioned above. Additionally, some families transition out of a K-8 school at 7thgrade, for a variety of reasons. For example, some K-12 (and 6-12 or 7-12) private schools have fewer openings at 9thgrade than at 7th. This results in 7thand 8thgrade classes at K-8 schools that are thinner, as families apply out sooner. The smaller class sizes can be a bonus, but this attrition also can affect morale, change the culture of a class, and result in fewer resources for these grades.

 

Keep It in Perspective

No matter where you choose to send your child to school, success has a myriad of factors beyond the K-12/K-8/K-6 debate. When a student thrives, it’s about educational philosophy, peer circles, access to creative endeavors, family dynamics, and so much more. Perhaps knowing this can make the research and decision about K-12/K-8/K-6 a little less stressful. Because, ultimately, the educational journey is a long one. And regardless of what type of school structure your children attend, they can forge a path that harnesses their potential and joy for learning.

 

Priya and Sanjay Nambiar run Nambiar Advising, a consulting practice that shepherds families through the private school admissions process, from helping clients find the best-fit schools for children to application support, essay editing, interview preparation, and more. Priya has spent more than 20 years in education and was the Associate Director of Admissions at the Brentwood School in Los Angeles. She earned a B.A. in Education from Brown University and an M.Ed. from Harvard University. Sanjay is an entrepreneur and professional writer who has written several award-winning children’s books. He earned a B.A. in Economics and Neurobiology from U.C. Berkeley and an M.B.A. from UCLA. To learn more, please visit www.nambiaradvising.com.

[1]Look, K. (2009). The great K-8 debate. The Philadelphia Education Fund. www.philaedfund.org/notebook/TheGreatK8Debate.htm

 

Keep up with the latest L.A. private school news and events on Beyond The Brochure’s Facebook Page.

Related Posts

  • 75
      I'm excited to welcome Priya Nambiar of Nambiar Advising to the blog today! I asked her a few questions about private school admissions and she shared her answers below. Thank you, Priya!--Christina How does your 8 years of experience as a former Associate Director of Admissions for Middle and Upper Schools at Brentwood and your…
    Tags: school, schools, angeles, los, nambiar, consultants, educational, advising, private
  • 62
    Here's a list of excellent resources to help you with your kid's admissions process:   Test Preparation (in alphabetical order) Academic Achievers: KinderPrep, ISEE, SAT, ACT and academic tutors Compass Education Group: ISEE, HSPT, SAT, ACT and academic tutors Hayutin & Associates: ISEE, SAT, ACT, academic tutoring, educational therapy and independent study Kinder Ready &…
    Tags: schools, independent, educational, school, angeles, los, private, consultants
  • 57
     Please note: Leonardo School will be hosting an information session on April 25th. The other day I was having coffee with my friend Lisa Marfisi when she told me about a new school called Leonardo. This was news to me, but as soon as she described this exciting new venture, I knew I wanted to…
    Tags: school, los, angeles, private, schools, independent
  • 56
    This morning, I had a lovely coffee meeting with Lisa Marfisi in West Hollywood. I first met Lisa when she was the admissions director at Echo Horizon School. We hit it off right away and it turns out we have several "small world" connections. Lisa just started working as an educational consultant, helping families find…
    Tags: school, educational, schools, private, los, angeles, years, consultants

Read More

Mirman School: Changes Happening Inside and Outside The Classroom

New Courts

Mirman is definitely a school that’s growing! Since Beyond the Brochure last visited the campus in 2015, that growth has been as much physical as it has been pedagogical: a campus expansion effort was wrapped up in the 2016-2017 school year, effectively doubling the school’s size and offering new athletics and community spaces for its students to enjoy. In just two years, the sports program has enjoyed explosive growth and a few championships to boot. Now, any student in Room 4 through Upper School Four has his or her pick of teams to play on.

 

Vorenberg with kids (1)

 “A Mirman School education speaks to all the dimensions of childhood.”

–Dan Vorenberg, Head of School 

As Beyond the Brochure pointed out in the 2015 profile, change continues to be in the air at Mirman — though it’s important to note that this change is all in service of the school’s core mission. A rebranding effort that rolled out in the 2016-2017 school year began with a serious survey of several constituencies, including alumni, past parents, current parents, students, and preschool directors. The resulting changes were aimed, in part, at demystifying what’s happening on this stretch of Mulholland Drive, allowing the school to widen its reach and better serve its mission. The somewhat opaque grade level labels (Room 1, Room 2, etc.) are on their way out, too; last year’s Kindergarten class (this year’s First Grade class) are trailblazers in that the grade level names will change to a more traditional structure as they progress through the ranks.

 

Classroom2

While it’s true that prospective students still need to meet an IQ requirement before applying, the school has, since the last profile, taken a long look at its admissions process and made some changes to ensure greater accessibility. They no longer accept the Stanford Binet, and instead require a 138 or above on the WPPSI-IV (Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence) and the WISC-V (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children). A full IQ FAQ is available on the school’s website by clicking here, but of note is the fact that the Wechsler tests have been updated to consider broad cultural factors and measures several subsets of intelligence. The pool of testers has been narrowed, too, to allow for consistency, and financial assistance is available for those who qualify.

When it comes to financial aid assistance, Mirman is, according to statistics from the California Association of Independent Schools and the National Association of Independent Schools, a leader in its category. One in six families receives some form of tuition assistance, with the average grant outpacing many competitor schools. More information on tuition assistance is outlined here on the school’s website.

 

Classroom

Finally, several signature programs continue to grow and gain traction at the school. The World Languages program has expanded to include Mandarin beginning in Kindergarten and running through Upper School. MirmanX is a middle-school startup accelerator which funds three projects each year to the tune of $10,000 to take them from concept to minimum viable product (with the kids retaining all of the intellectual property). A stellar performing arts program includes two full-scale theatre productions each year, and an award-winning Choir will be performing at Carnegie Hall this summer. And the importance of social-emotional learning is underscored by student leadership councils, service learning partnerships, and an Advisory program in the upper school.

For more information, visit www.mirman.org

 

Keep up with all the latest Los Angeles private school news and events on Beyond The Brochure’s Facebook Page! 

Related Posts

  • 61
    This is the BIG WEEK. Finally after months of waiting, schools will notify parents about elementary school admissions decisions on Friday, March 18. If you applied for secondary school, or if you applied to Pasadena schools, you most likely found out yesterday.  Friday is the BIG DAY for L.A., you been waiting for since you…
    Tags: school, private, los, angeles
  • 60
      Hi Friends! Happy Summer! Hope you're enjoying our hot summer here in L.A. We just returned from my son's basketball tournament in Las Vegas where it hit 113 degrees. That's just too hot! I posted the team's photo on Beyond The Brochure's Facebook page. If you're reading this post, you are probably anticipating the…
    Tags: school, private, angeles, los
  • 59
      I'm updating this previous post since I've been hearing that this year (2016-17) is one of the most competitive for L.A. private elementary school admissions. That probably means more kids will end up on wait-lists than in a less competitive year. A frequently asked question is, "Does a wait-list notification really mean NO or…
    Tags: school, private, angeles, los
  • 57
      Mirman School evokes a sense of mystery among parents looking for a private elementary and/or middle school in Los Angeles. It’s a school for brainy kids who need a place where they will be challenged to the full extent of their capabilities, where they will be encouraged to explore their deep interests and where…
    Tags: school, mirman, gifted

Read More

The ISEE Entrance Exam: Is Three Times A Charm? by Matthew Hayutin

ISEE photo
Photo: Shutterstock

 

Dear Readers:

I’m excited to publish guest post by Matthew Hayutin of Hayutin & Associates. I think you’ll find this piece helpful since the ISEE often causes stress for both parents and kids who are applying to L.A. private schools–that was definitely the case for our family and my kids could only take it once. Now kids can take it 3 times! But should they? Here’s more information on that question –Christina

 

Is Three Times A Charm?

Guess what, folks?  The ISEE (Independent School Entrance Exam), a torturous, standardized test once offered only once per school year, is now available 3 times a year!  Doesn’t that sound awesome?  I hear all the test prep mills tapping their calculators, working on an algorithm to capitalize on independent school admissions anxiety.

The ISEE is typically required for admission at most Los Angeles-based, independent and private day schools for prospective students who are candidates for entry into grades 5 and up.  Just to add to the confusion, there are other standardized tests mandated for admission to parochial and boarding schools.

But back to the ISEE: why would you put your kid through an absurdly long test twice, or even three times?  Isn’t that cruel and unusual punishment?

Not necessarily.

Don’t get me wrong—we love the “one and done” approach to ISEE prep: students prepare well, take the test once and tap out.

But what about kids who fall ill the night before the big exam?

Or the ones who just have a really lousy day and leave too many easy points on the table?

Sometimes just the promise of a retake helps students relax into the test and perform better. And voilà!  No retake necessary.

We’re talking about three ISEE testing seasons:

Fall (August-November)

Winter (December-March)

Spring/Summer (April-July)

Unless you just moved and your student is applying somewhere after conventional admissions deadlines, just forget that last one. It’s all about the first two seasons.

Every student deserves a custom approach and strategic timeline, but here’s the typical trajectory many test prep gurus like us recommend:

Register for a date in the fall, October or November, and a second one in December.

Unless you’re reading this too late (I’m not judging you) and your child didn’t start preparing in time (still not judging you), pull the trigger sometime in December.  January is no fun.  Your entire family will be exhausted by then from all the applications. Wouldn’t you rather be on vacation so you can have cocktails with fancy ice and forget all this nonsense?

Plus some schools don’t love waiting until January for test results, so perform your due diligence and chart those deadlines.

If your child performs well enough on test one in the fall season, make like the protagonist in Jordan Peele’s seminal film and GET OUT.  Cancel the second ISEE sitting, even if you forfeit the registration fees.

How will you know your child did well enough to run, not walk away?  If your daughter has put in the time, including sitting for simulated practice exams, you’ll already know all too well how she’s trending in terms of those icky stanines (1-9). You’ll know if she peaked, plateaued, or fell flat.

Many kids prepare over the summer to take the edge off all that fall test prep and application pressure.  It’s a great way to build a foundation and make a more informed decision about how much test prep is even warranted come September.  If your child is already booked all summer, fret not.  Just plan on a regular weekly effort come fall.

But wait—you have another agonizing decision to make:  will your child suffer less through the exam on paper or computer?

Give this one some thought.  If your kid isn’t a proficient typist, bye bye computer.  That timed essay is excruciating for anyone who struggles to hunt and peck.

There are exceptions.  Kids with illegible handwriting and no laptop accommodation may want to consider a Prometric Center—that’s where you have to drive if your child isn’t taking the thing on paper.  It’s not a warm and fuzzy place, with logistical challenges of its own, but plenty of kids go there and do just fine.  At least you get to book your own appointment.

There’s always more strategy, but ultimately, this ISEE thing is not in your control.

So bite down.  Hold your child’s hand. Look into his or her perfect eyes and remind yourself of what you already know, deep down: you’re going to get through this.

 

Matthew Hayutin, founding owner at Hayutin & Associates, is a parent and educator who still dreams that one day the ISEE will just go away—but not get replaced by something even worse.  He serves on the board at PS1 Pluralistic School One, where both of his children attend school.

Coming soon: Matthew explains the details of ISEE scoring including what constitutes a below average, average and above average score.

 Keep up with all the latest L.A. private school news and events by following Beyond The Brochure on Facebook!

 

Related Posts

  • 64
    Here's a list of excellent resources to help you with your kid's admissions process:   Test Preparation (in alphabetical order) Academic Achievers: KinderPrep, ISEE, SAT, ACT and academic tutors Compass Education Group: ISEE, HSPT, SAT, ACT and academic tutors Hayutin & Associates: ISEE, SAT, ACT, academic tutoring, educational therapy and independent study Kinder Ready &…
    Tags: schools, isee, independent, preparation, school, angeles, los, private, test, associates
  • 49
     Please note: Leonardo School will be hosting an information session on April 25th. The other day I was having coffee with my friend Lisa Marfisi when she told me about a new school called Leonardo. This was news to me, but as soon as she described this exciting new venture, I knew I wanted to…
    Tags: school, will, students, los, angeles, private, schools, independent
  • 49
        Click on Academic Achievers for more information.
    Tags: private, school, isee, exam, entrance, test
  • 48
      Here's an article today in the L.A Times about the frenzy created by "Black Friday" the day last week when admissions emails were received by parents.   Don't miss a thing! Like Beyond The Brochure on Facebook!    
    Tags: times, day, school, private, angeles, los

Read More

Academic Achievers presents “Demystifying the Private School Application Process” with Lisa Marfisi

To RSVP for this free event, click here

 

Academic Achievers :Lisa Marfisi

 

 

To RSVP for this free event, click here

Follow Beyond The Brochure on Facebook for all the latest L.A. private schools news and events!

Related Posts

  • 72
    This morning, I had a lovely coffee meeting with Lisa Marfisi in West Hollywood. I first met Lisa when she was the admissions director at Echo Horizon School. We hit it off right away and it turns out we have several "small world" connections. Lisa just started working as an educational consultant, helping families find…
    Tags: lisa, school, educational, l.a, marfisi, schools, academic, follow, brochure, facebook
  • 64
    Here's a list of excellent resources to help you with your kid's admissions process:   Test Preparation (in alphabetical order) Academic Achievers: KinderPrep, ISEE, SAT, ACT and academic tutors Compass Education Group: ISEE, HSPT, SAT, ACT and academic tutors Hayutin & Associates: ISEE, SAT, ACT, academic tutoring, educational therapy and independent study Kinder Ready &…
    Tags: schools, academic, educational, preparation, school, private, test, consultants, brochure, achievers
  • 52
    We're excited to have Lisa Marfisi's  words of wisdom on the blog! Lisa has been an L.A. private school admissions director for 15 years (see her full bio below).  So, you’re applying to private school and you think you have a plan.  You’ve visited many schools, narrowed your choices and applied. You have edited your answers…
    Tags: school, schools, lisa, l.a, private, marfisi
  • 43
        Click on Academic Achievers for more information.
    Tags: academic, achievers, click, l.a, private, school, event, events, test

Read More

Waiting for Admissions Letters and Getting In, Wait-listed, Rejected by Barbara Cameron

thorns and roses concept

 

 

Here’s another insightful, honest post from our friend Barbara Cameron. This time she writes about the thorny issue of waiting for admissions letters. Then, there’s the rose at the end of the journey…if things go well. We’re wishing all of you the very best of luck as you wait for letters and find out results!–Christina and Anne 

We wait for an online purchase to arrive. We wait in traffic. We wait for our Double Cappuccino extra froth at Starbucks (where I recently saw a woman flip out on the barista because she waited “three minutes and it was all wrong” when she received it). We wait for news from an oncologist about ourselves, or a loved one or a friend when all wrong takes on an entirely different meaning. We wait for our babies to be born.

And then, of course, we sometimes wait for acceptance letters from L.A. private schools to hear where our children will get their education. It is easy to say, “Keep it in perspective, it isn’t a life or death matter,” because it is not. However, seriously hard work, time and effort have gone into this process more times than not. Our children’s education matters a great deal. Expectations are high, and fear can creep in, so how do we handle it?

I had a friend who drove around her neighborhood trying to track down the mailman the day the letters were due to arrive, which some might judge extreme, but if you knew her, you would laugh. That is her. She laughs now. Getting a little crazy is okay if that’s what you do. The Los Angeles Times famously coined the term “Black Friday” to describe this day.

For each family dynamic, there is a valid answer to how do we wait for this news. My crazy, I tended to play the waiting down, quell the anxiety by telling myself whatever happens it happens the way it is meant to happen. Whatever works; it’s a trick of the mind. I created options so I could remain faithful to my mantra. Some families are clear about their few choices and bet on that. These days, parents frantically check their email or log onto sites which schools posts acceptances. Check your email’s junk mail folder too because I’ve heard that’s where some of these admissions emails end up.

I guess the one real thing to take away: in many ways, it is a crapshoot. It’s a roll of the dice no matter that you may have the odds in your favor. The best way to prepare yourself and your children, is to ready them to handle whatever happens, which means you as a parent must control it. Lead by example.

We waited before kindergarten, were accepted to The Willows, our first choice, wait-listed at PS1, got rejected from The Center for Early Education, and, well, case in point, I can’t even remember the rest now. Of course, I signed the contract for The Willows instantly. As for high school, we did as we were told because we needed financial aid; we threw our net wide. Seven schools, applications, interviews, tours! Seven letters to await. Crapshoot: one school we thought he had a good chance, a no-go. The school we thought was out of his league was a yes, and wait-listed at one he liked very much. Fairly last minute, my son did a shadow day at Arête and fell in love with it. They accepted him; two very different schools. I remember conversations with family and friends, what to do? On the last day to decide, driving to work, debating which would be best for him, after receiving generous financial aid from both, I just made a decision, knowing we can never, in the end, know the answer to that question. Arête, I still believe, was the best choice!

Maybe all of this means remembering that we are always in the process of waiting for something; waiting is hard. Traffic can make us late to an important meeting. If we crave and look forward to our morning caffeine, waiting for it might seem impossible if the line is long. Some news we think will change our lives, and some possibly will; some may not, although we feel (as the Cappuccino women felt) it will.

Maybe teach your kids, the degree of importance varies, but waiting is a part of life. It never stops. The outcome of hard work, whatever it may be, is a part of life. Whatever happens, we deal with it and move on. There is no other choice. How we handle what we receive after the wait is– and will– become a part of who we are.

Barbara Cameron is the 2012 winner of the American Literary Review nonfiction contest, judged by Alice Elliot Dark, and her winning essay, “Hawk Blood,” was published in the journal. It was republished in the Colorado Review as an editor’s pick. Her essay, “In Avalon, She Fell,” was a finalist in a 2017 literary contest, judged by Abigail Thomas. She has studied with Mary Gaitskill and with Tom Jenks, founder and co-editor of Narrative. Barbara is a graduate of Barnard College, a former restaurant server and now manager, a single mom by choice and a resident of Los Angeles. You can read Barbara’s most recent essay about Financial Aid on Beyond The Brochure and her creative nonfiction in Angels Flight Literary West.

Check out Beyond The Brochure’s previous posts about admissions letters, wait-lists and rejections and here on The Daily Truffle. 

Follow Beyond The Brochure on Facebook for all the latest news about L.A. private schools.

Good luck to everyone!

Related Posts

  • 90
    This is the BIG WEEK. Finally after months of waiting, schools will notify parents about elementary school admissions decisions on Friday, March 18. If you applied for secondary school, or if you applied to Pasadena schools, you most likely found out yesterday.  Friday is the BIG DAY for L.A., you been waiting for since you…
    Tags: school, schools, admissions, private, los, letters, angeles
  • 77
    Hi Everyone, Please join me for this FREE event! Who: Christina Simon, co-author, Beyond The Brochure: An Insider's Guide To Private Elementary Schools In Los Angeles What: Navigating The L.A. Private Elementary School Admissions Process Selecting Schools To Visit, Types of Schools and School Tours Written Applications Parent Interviews Your Child's Testing/Visiting Day Letters of…
    Tags: schools, private, angeles, brochure, los, school, process, will, admissions, day
  • 76
      Hi Friends! Happy Summer! Hope you're enjoying our hot summer here in L.A. We just returned from my son's basketball tournament in Las Vegas where it hit 113 degrees. That's just too hot! I posted the team's photo on Beyond The Brochure's Facebook page. If you're reading this post, you are probably anticipating the…
    Tags: schools, school, admissions, process, private, angeles, los
  • 72
      The countdown begins for notifications from L.A. and Pasadena private schools. Schools will notify families on March 10 and 17th. I remember applying for kindergarten, then DK, then 7th and 4th grades. Each time was stressful. Developmental Kindergarten was less stressful since my son was a sibling at Willows. As we waited, it was…
    Tags: school, admissions, letters, schools, l.a, will, family, process, private, waiting

Read More