Waiting for Admissions Letters and Getting In, Wait-listed, Rejected by Barbara Cameron

thorns and roses concept

 

 

Here’s another insightful, honest post from our friend Barbara Cameron. This time she writes about the thorny issue of waiting for admissions letters. Then, there’s the rose at the end of the journey…if things go well. We’re wishing all of you the very best of luck as you wait for letters and find out results!–Christina and Anne 

We wait for an online purchase to arrive. We wait in traffic. We wait for our Double Cappuccino extra froth at Starbucks (where I recently saw a woman flip out on the barista because she waited “three minutes and it was all wrong” when she received it). We wait for news from an oncologist about ourselves, or a loved one or a friend when all wrong takes on an entirely different meaning. We wait for our babies to be born.

And then, of course, we sometimes wait for acceptance letters from L.A. private schools to hear where our children will get their education. It is easy to say, “Keep it in perspective, it isn’t a life or death matter,” because it is not. However, seriously hard work, time and effort have gone into this process more times than not. Our children’s education matters a great deal. Expectations are high, and fear can creep in, so how do we handle it?

I had a friend who drove around her neighborhood trying to track down the mailman the day the letters were due to arrive, which some might judge extreme, but if you knew her, you would laugh. That is her. She laughs now. Getting a little crazy is okay if that’s what you do. The Los Angeles Times famously coined the term “Black Friday” to describe this day.

For each family dynamic, there is a valid answer to how do we wait for this news. My crazy, I tended to play the waiting down, quell the anxiety by telling myself whatever happens it happens the way it is meant to happen. Whatever works; it’s a trick of the mind. I created options so I could remain faithful to my mantra. Some families are clear about their few choices and bet on that. These days, parents frantically check their email or log onto sites which schools posts acceptances. Check your email’s junk mail folder too because I’ve heard that’s where some of these admissions emails end up.

I guess the one real thing to take away: in many ways, it is a crapshoot. It’s a roll of the dice no matter that you may have the odds in your favor. The best way to prepare yourself and your children, is to ready them to handle whatever happens, which means you as a parent must control it. Lead by example.

We waited before kindergarten, were accepted to The Willows, our first choice, wait-listed at PS1, got rejected from The Center for Early Education, and, well, case in point, I can’t even remember the rest now. Of course, I signed the contract for The Willows instantly. As for high school, we did as we were told because we needed financial aid; we threw our net wide. Seven schools, applications, interviews, tours! Seven letters to await. Crapshoot: one school we thought he had a good chance, a no-go. The school we thought was out of his league was a yes, and wait-listed at one he liked very much. Fairly last minute, my son did a shadow day at Arête and fell in love with it. They accepted him; two very different schools. I remember conversations with family and friends, what to do? On the last day to decide, driving to work, debating which would be best for him, after receiving generous financial aid from both, I just made a decision, knowing we can never, in the end, know the answer to that question. Arête, I still believe, was the best choice!

Maybe all of this means remembering that we are always in the process of waiting for something; waiting is hard. Traffic can make us late to an important meeting. If we crave and look forward to our morning caffeine, waiting for it might seem impossible if the line is long. Some news we think will change our lives, and some possibly will; some may not, although we feel (as the Cappuccino women felt) it will.

Maybe teach your kids, the degree of importance varies, but waiting is a part of life. It never stops. The outcome of hard work, whatever it may be, is a part of life. Whatever happens, we deal with it and move on. There is no other choice. How we handle what we receive after the wait is– and will– become a part of who we are.

Barbara Cameron is the 2012 winner of the American Literary Review nonfiction contest, judged by Alice Elliot Dark, and her winning essay, “Hawk Blood,” was published in the journal. It was republished in the Colorado Review as an editor’s pick. Her essay, “In Avalon, She Fell,” was a finalist in a 2017 literary contest, judged by Abigail Thomas. She has studied with Mary Gaitskill and with Tom Jenks, founder and co-editor of Narrative. Barbara is a graduate of Barnard College, a former restaurant server and now manager, a single mom by choice and a resident of Los Angeles. You can read Barbara’s most recent essay about Financial Aid on Beyond The Brochure and her creative nonfiction in Angels Flight Literary West.

Check out Beyond The Brochure’s previous posts about admissions letters, wait-lists and rejections and here on The Daily Truffle. 

Follow Beyond The Brochure on Facebook for all the latest news about L.A. private schools.

Good luck to everyone!

Related Posts

  • 90
    This is the BIG WEEK. Finally after months of waiting, schools will notify parents about elementary school admissions decisions on Friday, March 18. If you applied for secondary school, or if you applied to Pasadena schools, you most likely found out yesterday.  Friday is the BIG DAY for L.A., you been waiting for since you…
    Tags: school, schools, admissions, private, los, letters, angeles
  • 77
    Hi Everyone, Please join me for this FREE event! Who: Christina Simon, co-author, Beyond The Brochure: An Insider's Guide To Private Elementary Schools In Los Angeles What: Navigating The L.A. Private Elementary School Admissions Process Selecting Schools To Visit, Types of Schools and School Tours Written Applications Parent Interviews Your Child's Testing/Visiting Day Letters of…
    Tags: schools, private, angeles, brochure, los, school, process, will, admissions, day
  • 76
      Hi Friends! Happy Summer! Hope you're enjoying our hot summer here in L.A. We just returned from my son's basketball tournament in Las Vegas where it hit 113 degrees. That's just too hot! I posted the team's photo on Beyond The Brochure's Facebook page. If you're reading this post, you are probably anticipating the…
    Tags: schools, school, admissions, process, private, angeles, los
  • 72
      The countdown begins for notifications from L.A. and Pasadena private schools. Schools will notify families on March 10 and 17th. I remember applying for kindergarten, then DK, then 7th and 4th grades. Each time was stressful. Developmental Kindergarten was less stressful since my son was a sibling at Willows. As we waited, it was…
    Tags: school, admissions, letters, schools, l.a, will, family, process, private, waiting

admin

Christina Simon: Los Angeles, California, United States I'm the mom of a daughter (15) and a son (12) who attend Viewpoint School in Calabasas. I live in Coldwater Canyon with my family and a rescue pit bull, Cocoa. Contact me at csimon2007@gmail.com

4 thoughts on “Waiting for Admissions Letters and Getting In, Wait-listed, Rejected by Barbara Cameron

  1. Thanks again for all your inside knowledge into applying to private schools in LA. One thing I don’t understand is why a school would accept you but without any financial aid when it’s clear that a student needs it. We were accepted to our top choice and was told we’d be put in a “wait pool” for financial aid. I’m not sure if I should wait, or how long this wait would be. I’ve never heard of this type of thing. Do you have any experience with this?

    Thank you.

    1. Hi Jamie, thanks for reading the blog and congratulations on the acceptance! I think it’s perfectly acceptable for you to call the school to ask since your question is a good one. I don’t know the specifics of your situation or even the school so it’s hard for me to say. But, call the admissions director and ask! The school accepted your child and you will soon be asked to put a non-refundable deposit down on the spot so it’s a fair question. I’ve asked Anne Simon, my co-author, for her opinion so stay tuned. All my best, Christina

      1. Hi Jamie, so without knowing your specific school or case, Anne thinks the financial aid “wait-pool” is the method the school is using to get students they want to accept the school’s offer by giving them substantial awards and then recycling that money to families in the wait-pool if they do not capture those admissions. Obviously, the want your child too, but there may be other families with bigger needs or other factors the school sees as beneficial. It’s also very possible the school thinks your family can afford it without aid. This sounds harsh and in a way it is. There is never enough financial aid to fill the need. So, call the school and ask. It can’t hurt! Hope that helps. Christina

        1. Thanks for you help! I ended up calling and just asking because the anticipating was killing me and they told me they really wanted my daughter and the school actually decides financial aid and admissions separately, where most schools take both in consideration when offering admission.
          They like to spread the aid amongst multiple students and my need was a little greater but they are currently working on a package that would offer me enough aid to attend. I had to let them know also that I would definitely attend if offered a financial aid package. So as of now, I am waiting for that offer and hoping it comes in before the Monday deadline.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>