Differences Between Traditional and Progressive Private Schools (Part 7)

Mr. Smythe-Bryon teaches kindergarten at a traditional private school in the hills of Los Angeles. He holds a BA from Dartmouth and an MA from Princeton in medieval history. His favorite part of the job is making sure his classroom is neat and tidy. Mr. Smythe-Bryon has memorized every species of butterfly (about 20,000). He is a lepidopterist, like the famed writer, Vladimir Nabokov, his  inspiration.  He encourages his students to find narrow, deep interests that will be their gateway to the Ivy League
Mr. Smythe-Bryon teaches kindergarten at a traditional private school in the hills of Los Angeles. He holds a BA from Dartmouth and an MA from Princeton in medieval history. His favorite part of the job is making sure his classroom is neat and tidy. Mr. Smythe-Bryon has memorized every species of butterfly (about 20,000). He is a lepidopterist, like the famed writer, Vladimir Nabokov, his inspiration. He encourages his students to find narrow, deep interests that will be their gateway to the Ivy League.
Poppy teaches at a progressive school on the Westside. After college, she found herself working at Starbucks. A regular customer, the head of the school, hired her away from Starbucks to teach 3rd grade. Sometimes, Poppy calls in sick and hangs out on Abbot Kinney in Venice, where parents join her to kick back. The kids love her. So do the parents
Poppy teaches at a progressive school on the Westside. After college, she found herself working at Starbucks. A regular customer, the head of the school, hired her away from Starbucks to teach 3rd grade. Sometimes, Poppy calls in sick and hangs out on Abbot Kinney in Venice, where parents join her to kick back. Poppy has a natural gift for teaching. The kids love her. So do the parents.

 

For more about the differences between traditional and progressive private schools: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6

 

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Christina Simon: Los Angeles, California, United States I'm the mom of a daughter (15) and a son (12) who attend Viewpoint School in Calabasas. I live in Coldwater Canyon with my family and a rescue pit bull, Cocoa. Contact me at csimon2007@gmail.com

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