Five Big Differences Between Traditional and Developmental/Progressive Private Schools

FCLA Soccer
FCLA Soccer

Many L.A. private schools are a hybrid of educational philosophies, a blend of school types (traditional, developmental and progressive) that define each institution. However, there are schools that are purely traditional or progressive and have chosen not to incorporate a mix of educational philosophies. Any of these school types can offer an academically challenging, intellectually rigorous learning environment. Selecting a school depends on your preferences as a parent and finding the best fit for your kid.

 

Here are 5 differences between traditional and developmental/progressive schools:

 

1. Traditional schools tend to teach critical thinking in conjunction with heavy content acquisition. Developmental/Progressive schools are more focused on the process of learning than detailed content acquisition. Teachers are interested in what students know in traditional schools. Developmental/progressive schools want to know what students think.

 

2. The curriculum at developmental/progressive schools includes more project based learning, where kids work in groups and projects can take a week or more.

 

3. Traditional schools have more homework, tests and quizzes. They tend to use textbooks more often than developmental/progressive schools.

 

4. The report cards and grading systems are very different. Developmental/Progressive schools tend to use narrative written reports for elementary school. Traditional schools use grades and/or numeric evaluation methods.

 

5. Academic achievement is celebrated in traditional schools. Honor lists are posted, students discuss grades. Developmental/progressive schools de-emphasize the focus on public display of individual academic success.

 

 

 

Related Posts

  • 70
    I'm always interested in what other moms have to say about their kid's admission experience and what they think about L.A. private school culture. So, I asked my friend Lia Langworthy to answer a few questions. Lia's, a former parent at Hollywood Schoolhouse--yes, the same school Prince Harry's finance, Meghan Markle, attended back when it…
    Tags: school, schools
  • 65
    If you aren't sure what school philosophy will be right for your kid, check out this roundup of previous posts on the topic to understand the important differences between traditional and progressive private schools!   5 Important Differences Between Traditional and Progressive Schools 5 Important Differences Between Traditional and Progressive Schools Part 2 Traditional or…
    Tags: traditional, school, schools
  • 62
    Few things can cause parents as much stress as navigating the private school admissions process. More and more, getting in to private schools, even starting at the elementary level, can be a daunting process. Tip #1: Spend a few hours researching private elementary school websites; create a list of schools you want to tour, create…
    Tags: school, schools
  • 51
    Update: Mark Brooks is no longer head of school at Pilgrim. He is now head of The Center For Early Education. As of July 1, 2017, Pilgrim's new head of school will be Paul Barsky.  My first introduction to the Pilgrim School was during my job as a senior legislative staffer for L.A. County Supervisor…
    Tags: school, schools, traditional

admin

Christina Simon: Los Angeles, California, United States I'm the mom of a daughter (15) and a son (12) who attend Viewpoint School in Calabasas. I live in Coldwater Canyon with my family and a rescue pit bull, Cocoa. Contact me at csimon2007@gmail.com

6 thoughts on “Five Big Differences Between Traditional and Developmental/Progressive Private Schools

  1. So interesting! I think this could be applied to public schools as well. After reading this post, I think my children’s charter is progressive. Thanks Christina!

  2. When we were looking at schools, I felt as though this was one of the questions that seemed to be so difficult to get answered. I occasionally felt as though certain schools were trying to be everything to everyone & didn’t want to alienate any families. t’s so much better when a school can be clear about where it stands & then parents can decide what fits best for them.

Leave a Reply to Gina Osher Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>